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Wanna see something really sad?

Posted: June 25th, 2019, 7:03 am
by Takehaniyasubiko

Re: Wanna see something really sad?

Posted: June 25th, 2019, 7:17 am
by Matt
Sad would be if they were in landfill. This is a good thing. They can be fixed, cleaned and re-sold to people to be used as functional units.

Re: Wanna see something really sad?

Posted: June 25th, 2019, 7:42 am
by Takehaniyasubiko
They will go to the landfill. This is just a bus stop for them. I think it's where they dismantle electronics because of garbage segregation.

Also, the conditions in that place are bad enough for rust to take over.

Re: Wanna see something really sad?

Posted: June 25th, 2019, 9:20 am
by Matt
Takehaniyasubiko wrote:
June 25th, 2019, 7:42 am
They will go to the landfill. This is just a bus stop for them. I think it's where they dismantle electronics because of garbage segregation.

Also, the conditions in that place are bad enough for rust to take over.
Oh well that's a real shame. The components should be recycled, most importantly of course the ABS plastic. I guarantee you those PlayStation's are there because of bad lasers.

Electronics usually don't rust because of the metals they are composed from. The metal RF shieldings inside the systems and around the connectors will, but those can be fixed by electrolysis.

Re: Wanna see something really sad?

Posted: June 25th, 2019, 9:37 am
by Takehaniyasubiko
Matt wrote:
June 25th, 2019, 9:20 am
Oh well that's a real shame. The components should be recycled, most importantly of course the ABS plastic. I guarantee you those PlayStation's are there because of bad lasers.

Electronics usually don't rust because of the metals they are composed from. The metal RF shieldings inside the systems and around the connectors will, but those can be fixed by electrolysis.
It's a shame alright. I've seen such "recycling centres" in my own country, but they weren't destroying consoles in such big numbers. However, I've seen something of that scale in Polish public schools with old PCs (like old Macs, 286-486s, and various 8-bit computers). Maybe it's different in Australia, but in Europe and USA old electronics are just "scrap metal".

Rust can attack PCBs as well if the conditions are really bad. E-caps can start to leak because of it, too. Not to mention the parallel ports getting badly corded. The casings simply get smashed. If you look closely, you'll notice some of those consoles are already smashed since somebody just dumped them on the heap.

Re: Wanna see something really sad?

Posted: June 27th, 2020, 6:53 pm
by Pixelated Sparkster
Seeing all of these consoles in one place looks amazing, I never did get the chance to see such retro consoles in one place as their value as video games is overlooked by their future successors, and would be thrown away.

But if they are to be thrown away, I am saddened by this. A lot of these old systems are slowly getting harder to find and these units could be salvaged to keep the ones currently working alive a lot longer.

What I'd give to have one of those dreamcasts on my gaming shelf :crying

Re: Wanna see something really sad?

Posted: June 30th, 2020, 2:10 am
by Klauserus
Wow ok. The Picture looks old, but i cant believe that, responsible people are not known about the value of this tons of consoles?!
More info would be nice: Where is that and why? The cellar of a dead nerd?

Re: Wanna see something really sad?

Posted: July 2nd, 2020, 1:00 am
by Takehaniyasubiko
Klauserus wrote:
June 30th, 2020, 2:10 am
Wow ok. The Picture looks old, but i cant believe that, responsible people are not known about the value of this tons of consoles?!
More info would be nice: Where is that and why? The cellar of a dead nerd?
The details for that picture weren't shared, but what "responsible people" would pile up consoles this way? It's obvious many of them were damaged, at least externally. This isn't somebody's collection. It looks like one of "recycling" centres where they would take old electronics from people and then cash in on a contract for disposing of them "safely". You can read about those places a lot online, especially in the US. They would typically just store all of it in some remote location instead of actually recycling it.